End of Week 1 Training!

After a week of training, I’ve found that a digital humanities project can come in many shapes. Just this week, while making a practice website for Defeat of Jesse James Day, we combined an online map, timeline, and exhibit into a single project. For each different project we take on, there are tons of online resources to help. For example, we’ve looked at websites that build custom timelines and maps that hardly require any coding on our side. Sometimes the process was as simple as inputting our data into a spreadsheet, and pasting an embed code onto the web page! As the term progresses, I’m excited to learn more about the digital humanities tools that already exist and how we might further customize them to fit our needs.

Tyler’s Introduction

Hello!  I’m Tyler, a sophomore prospective math major at Carleton.  Among other things, I’m interested in the ways that digital humanities projects process and manipulate data (I also enjoy the more math-y parts of math like proofs, but they make for less interesting blog posts).  As a digital humanities associate, I am excited to see how technology helps scholars analyze large amounts of data, while still making the result understandable to the average person.

After a day of training, I’ve realized just how much thought scholars put into the methods used to process and present their findings.  In digital humanities, sources that scholars interpret must be made readable by a machine- but the processed sources must then be put back into a form that people would want to read!  This year, I’m looking forward to developing a better understanding of the various methods digital humanities scholars use to produce their finished works.