Luna’s Introduction (#3)

(Alright people, let’s do this one last time.)

Hi! My name is Luna Yee and I’m now a senior Computer Science and Linguistics major planning to graduate after Winter term. This is my third year as a Digital Humanities Associate (DHA). I’ve been involved with a fair few of our group’s projects at this point, as well as support for a number of DH-involved classes. I’ve also been involved with the DH-adjacent Dakota Language Project through my linguistics work—check it out!

One reason I find DHA work rewarding is that it lets me engage as a user for digital tools. Academically, I tend to work on the development side—that is, with programming and design. By participating in like technologies as a user, support resource—and even sometimes a correspondent with the developers—I feel that I’ve gotten a good deal of practical perspective on the struggles of user experience and the design lifecycle. I expect this experience to translate positively into my professional work—and more immediately, into my CS comps.

Outside of academic and professional pursuits, I sleep enjoy reading fiction and fiddling around with creative writing. In the past few years, I’ve expanded to other fiction media and developed a taste for those as well, but a nice novel still wins in my book (ha). I’m also a member of the Aikido Club on campus, which serves as a nice enforced structured break from work—especially in the age of Zoom fatigue.

You can also see the (more formal) introduction at Digital Humanities @Carleton College page.

Miyuki’s Introduction

Hello! My name is Miyuki (she/her) and I am a junior History major and Philosophy minor from Tokyo, Japan. This is going to be my second year as a Digital Humanities Associate, and I’m excited to work on more DH projects!

As a History major with a strong interest in Public History, I have taken several history courses with digital projects at Carleton, and I’m passionate about thinking how technology can foster humanities. In the last year, I worked on projects using mainly WordPress and Omeka, so I’m hoping to tackle other tools to develop my DH skills this year.

In my spare time, I love creating art, taking photos, and strolling in the Arb.

Hello! My name is Kunsang:)

Hello! My name is Kunsang and I am a senior Math major. I am eager to be a DHA so I could develop my skills on various tools that digital humanities pertains to. I love learning new programming languages and algorithms but I’ve never quite ventured into the arts of digital humanities – this will be a fresh and an exciting experience! Over the summer, I worked as a sales development representative intern and the job required learning about various sales tools in a short period of time, in addition to data analysis and visualizations. I believe these skills will definitely prove to be helpful as a DHA.

Outside my class, I am in Carleton choir and sometimes join Synchrony dances for the good energy. I also love watching movies, playing chess, and doing yoga during my leisure hours!

You can also see the introduction at Digital Humanities @Carleton College page.

Alan’s Introduction

Hello! I’m Alan. I am a senior psychology major at Carleton and this is my first year working as a DHA. I look forward to learning different methods and approaches that scholars take to tackle projects in digital humanities. I am also excited to learn about different ways to apply data and creative methods to scrape data when working in the realm of humanities.

Currently, I am working on a non-fiction essay film about herders in China and how their traditional lifestyle/relationship to the environment are changing as different technologies are introduced into their lives. I am also developing this into a larger project. I am trying to investigate the distance between personal identity and traditional culture of the younger generation, exploring how does the coming of age in the modern era influence our identities.

You can also see the introduction at Digital Humanities @Carleton College page.

Miyuki’s Introduction

Hi, my name is Miyuki, a sophomore and a potential History and Studio Art double major from Tokyo, Japan. This is my first year working as a Digital Humanities Associate. I am interested in the relationship between history and people/society, and I think that Digital Humanities enables us to find a variety of ways to interact with history and it encourages us to think of a better society. I am excited to push myself into this field and learn new digital skills to combine with my academic interests.

Besides the associate, I have been working on managing a blog to share experiences of studying abroad with Japanese students as a co-manager of students’ organization.

In my leisure time, I love drawing, painting, taking photographs, listening to music, and singing, and traveling. Besides, I belong to the Carleton Orchestra and play the viola.

You can also see the introduction at Digital Humanities @Carleton College page.

Luna’s (Re-)Introduction

Hi! My name is Luna Yee and I’m now a junior Computer Science major (I plan to double major with Linguistics and minor in Cognitive Science). This is my second consecutive year as a Digital Humanities Associate; last year, I worked on typesetting in LaTeX for the Undergraduate Journal of Humanistic Studies (UJHS), tutoring students in Omeka (in-person and via online tools) for the Global Religions in Minnesota class, and managing the back-end of our other student-content online publications—namely the Prairie Creek Wildlife Management (PCWM) Area Digital Collection and the Carleton Guide to Medieval Rome (CGMR; updated site coming soon!)—among other projects.

While in academics I mostly focus on the development side of the digital sphere—that is, computer programming and algorithmic studies and research—I find that working in the Digital Humanities offers a diverse and fulfilling scope in which to apply such tools. DH allows us to use digital technologies not only to study human histories, cultures, and conditions but also to spread such information to a wider audience.

Outside of the realm of digital work and studies, I fancy myself an avid reader and discerning fan of fiction in all media—even though I find myself rarely with enough time to consume the material—and have developed a penchant for writing over the course of the years. I also love music (that is, listening to music; it’s been quite some time since I actively played an instrument) and the study of music perception and cognition.

You can also see the introduction at Digital Humanities @Carleton College page.

Grace’s Introduction

Hi! I’m Grace, a junior history major from New Jersey, and this will be my second year working as a Digital Humanities Associate. I just returned from studying abroad in Italy where I managed a program blog and assisted with the Carleton Guide to Medieval Rome.

Although I’m a history major, I’ve always had an interest in technology and have some experience in computer science, haven taken courses at Carleton and worked in website creation since high school. For me, Digital Humanities is a way to combine both of these interests and I love seeing how STEM can transform and aid humanities-based research.

In my free time, I love reading, cross word puzzles, and listening to music. Asides from being a DHA, I work in the Off-Campus Studies Office and have a radio show on KRLX.

You can also see the introduction at Digital Humanities @Carleton College page.

Aaron’s Introduction

Hello my name is Aaron Young and I am a Senior History major with a minor in Arabic and Middle East studies. I am particularly drawn to history for its emphasis on storytelling and the analysis of how we tell these stories. I believe that the Digital Humanities are a unique way to showcase how we interact with stories. This is my first year working as a DHA and I am very excited to be able to challenge myself by learning new skills that will combine I can combine with my historical studies.

Outside of my role as a DHA and my academics, my hobbies including running, acting, and reading and watching movies.

You can also see the introduction at Digital Humanities @Carleton College page.

Zobeida’s Introduction

Hello! My name is Zobeida Chaffee, and I am a senior History Major taking minors in Archaeology and Medieval and Renaissance Studies. This will be my second year as a DHA, and I am eager to continue to develop my skills in this field, so that I can one day apply them to my life after Carleton, as well as to my coursework. I find that Digital Humanities can be invaluable in the field of historical preservation, as well as in education. By digitizing and 3D modeling artifacts and historical records, we can make history more accessible to the public, while simultaneously preserving it for generations to come. These websites can also offer creative learning tools, and resources for teachers. In this digital age, it’s important to be able to reach the public on all platforms.

When I’m not working on my coursework or attempting to make progress on my comps, I enjoy exploring the outdoors, creative writing, and reading murder mysteries.

Luna’s Introduction

Hello! My name is Luna Yee and I’m currently a sophomore at Carleton College, hoping to double major in Computer Science and Cognitive Science. If I had to put my academic pursuits into a single question, it would be this: how can we better understand computers, and how can computers better understand us? A true form of artificial intelligence might still be a pipe dream due to practical limitations (the human brain holds an astounding amount of data), but we have the tools and methodologies to at least have intelligent user interfaces and even user-tailored experiences. Computational linguistics, for example, is a field I have hopes of working in: the intricacies of teaching a computer to understand the nuances of human speech fascinates me.

Digital humanities is the exact linguistic match to this: combining computer platforms with the literal study of humans. I have a fondness for working on elegant user interfaces, and on designing with effective user input in mind. The way I see it, the more ease of access and effective response available in our computers, the better we can preserve and pass on the wisdoms we’ve learned as a society. And that might seem like a bit of a weighty description to give to the humanities, but if you ask me, that’s exactly what we’re working on here: efficiently preserving and accurately representing histories (of places, objects, people, societies, and so on) to make them more accessible to the world at large, and generations to come.